Elephant Twins Born in South Africa

December 18th, 2014

A rare pair of elephant twins have been born in Pongola Game Reserve in Northern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa and are doing well according to initial reports.

Scientific evidence suggests that there is less than one percent prevalence rate of elephants twinning and even less of a chance that both twins survive into adulthood, making the birth of these young elephant twins an incredibly rare natural occurrence.

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The yet unnamed twins were born to a 31 year old elephant cow called Curve, so named for the curve of one of her tusks. However the sex of the twins remains unconfirmed as Curve is being given enough space and a fighting chance to beat the mortality odds for the twins.

“This is the best approach,” said elephant specialist Dr. Ian Whyte from the Dept. of Scientific Services at the National Parks Board, Kruger National Park.

“The lose of one of the twins usually occurs as the increasing demand for milk by two calves cannot be met by the mother and the less dominant of the two calves usually cannot gain access to its share. One rather famous Matriarch in Kruger dubbed MaMerle produced a set of twins in 2002, both of which survived to post weaning age, and she then produced a second set in 2006, both of which had survived to more than a year old when she was last seen. Curve needs a stress free environment to beat the odds.”






Maasai Olympics Begin!

December 16th, 2014
The 2014 Maasai Olympics have begun! Maasai athletes from villages all over East Africa took to the fields December 13th to compete in the biannual competition created to replace the traditional lion-hunting as the way to earn status.

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A Maasai moran athlete has his face smeared with red ocher paint during preparations for the Maasai Olympics at the Sidai Oleng Wildlife Sanctuary in southern Kenya on Dec. 13, 2014.

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At the foot of snow-capped Mount Kilimanjaro, Kenya’s famed Maasai warriors competed for honor and prestige, not by hunting lions but by running, jumping and throwing.

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A young Maasai warrior throws a javelin during the competition.

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A Maasai warrior wears his hair in the traditional style.

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Maasai athletes take their positions at the start of a race.

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A Maasai warrior makes the high jump, not in Olympic fashion but in Maasai warrior-style, a vertical jump from a standing position. Athletes must touch a high line with the top of their heads.

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Young Maasai women arrive to support the young warriors from their village.

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A Maasai competitor takes part in the “rungu” or Maasai club throwing event.

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Maasai women spectators whoop and cheer as runners from their village pass them in the lead.

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People pour water on a young Maasai man who collapsed after finishing his five-kilometer run.

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Maasai men sing and dance to celebrate an athlete from their village who won the 200m sprint.


Chase The Sun: Zanzibar

December 10th, 2014

Chase the Sun was a concept born out of the desire to cinematically explore beautiful locations and share that journey with the world around us. The Chase The Sun travel video was created as a way of expressing my personal experience of Zanzibar. Capturing the magic of the many places and people in Zanzibar was a dream come true. The island has a unique allure – alive with adventure and discovery.



Initially, the video’s research involved Sarah Scott, the producer, and myself traveling around Zanzibar scouting the ideal vantage points for shooting Zanzibar’s locals, tourists and further immersing ourselves in the narratives and energies of the island.


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Although both my parents are Nigerian, my birth and upbringing was solely in London. That separation resulted in my limited connection with the African continent and as such Chase the Sun was always going to be an odyssey of self-reflection and discovery, presenting me with a long awaited opportunity to reconnect with Africa and learn more about her landscape and beauty.

With Sarah having been born in South Africa and having lived in Tanzania for a period of time, her first hand knowledge of Zanzibar and its customs helped to not only provide a logistical framework for the video but also to prepare me, as an outsider, for the African experience.


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Seeing the island for the first time I was able to appreciate the landscape with new eyes, interweaving my personal experience with the remarkable sights of the island.


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From the start we were determined to make the audience feel they could participate in the journey, so it was important to present Zanzibar as a place accessible to all – not just the glamorous and privileged. And we wanted to inspire audiences to take up their own adventures.


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I hope one day to capture the splendour of other magical African locations. Africa holds so much to be discovered and its breathtaking beauty is incomprehensible, I hope that our video will inspire you; to live everyday, to pursue your happiness, to chase your sun.


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The films creative direction was achieved by collaborating with the Unique Perspective Pictures (UPP) team who supplied drones, underwater, high-speed and cinema quality cameras. The music for the film was supplied by the innovative electronic producer Von D curiosity of Subbalicious Records.





Written by: Obinna Mgbado, director of Chase the Sun



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