August 17: Arrival in Windhoek


After landing at Windhoek’s International Hosea Kutako Airport, you are transferred to Galton House guesthouse for your first night in Namibia. After your arrival at the guesthouse you will have time to settle into your room before dinner with our Namibian guides. Overnight Galton House. Dinner.


Galton House

Galton House is Windhoek’s newest accommodation establishment. Named after the famous explorer Sir Francis Galton, it has a relaxed but efficient style which creates a very welcoming atmosphere. A mere ten minute drive from the center of town and perched on the edge of Windhoek’s northernmost affluent suburb of Eros, guests staying here will be ensured of peace and tranquility. The seven rooms are all equipped with internet connectivity, satellite television, coffee/tea station and general guest amenities. The communal areas consist of a large lounge, dining room, swimming pool and garden. There is also a delightful ‘al fresco’ dining area by the pool, serving freshly prepared and very tasty meals. There are also a number shops, restaurants and supermarkets within easy striking distance.

August 18, 19 & 20: Sossusvlei


This morning we set out southwest through the scenic Khomas Hochland highlands before heading down the Great Escarpment into the Namib Desert below. We’ll enjoy a picnic lunch at a scenic location en route and will arrive at Sossus Dune Lodge in the late afternoon. This eco-conscious camp is our base for the next three nights while we explore the remarkable sights of the Namib Desert. If there is still time when we arrive, we can visit Sesriem Canyon or if not, we'll visit it the following day.

August 19, we have a full day of photography in the dunes with an early morning excursion. Since our camp is already inside the park, we can get into Sossusvlei before everyone else and we’ll see the sun rise and capture the dunes whilst the light is soft and shadows accentuate their towering shapes and curves. This area boasts some of the highest free-standing sand dunes in the world. Our guides will give you an insight on the formation of the Namib Desert and its myriad of fascinating creatures and plants that have adapted to survive these harsh environs.

The last morning here we rise before dawn for a remarkable hot air balloon flight over the dunes. The balloon rises as the sun rises. The first light hour of the day is known to be the most spectacular, especially in the desert with the rich contrast of color and shape on the towering sand dunes of the Sossusvlei Area, on the vast desert plains and surrounding mountain ranges. The flight itself takes about one hour and ends with an exclusive champagne breakfast at the landing spot in the midst of nature. Return to the lodge on a nature drive and after lunch we have the option to return to the dunes in the afternoon to capture more images in this truly amazing scenery. Three nights Sossus Dune Lodge. All meals.


Sossus Dune Lodge

Situated within the Namib Naukluft National Park and close to the Sesriem Canyon, this lodge provides sweeping vistas of the dunes to the west and guests benefit from being able to reach Sossusvlei before sunrise, or to stay until after sunset. Chalets are interlinked by elevated wooden walkways, and consist of 23 well-spaced en suite desert chalets, equipped with tea stations and small fridges. All rooms offer magnificent open vistas of the surrounding landscapes.

August 21 & 22: Swakopmund


We set off after breakfast for the coast this morning. The fascinating drive today takes us northwest through awesome and ever changing desert landscapes of the Namib Naukluft National Park, including the impressive Gaub and Kuiseb canyons. We meet the coast at the port town of Walvis Bay and then continue north to Swakopmund where we can enjoy the pleasant seaside location and cooler coastal air for the next two nights. After an early breakfast the following day we drive along the scenic coastal road back to Walvis Bay for a seal and dolphin cruise within the outer lagoon and harbor. This is an ideal way of photographing Cape fur seals, Heaviside and bottlenose dolphins, pelicans, flamingos and a wide variety of other sea birds. If we are lucky, there is also a chance of seeing whales, leatherback turtles and sunfish. This afternoon we will explore Walvis Bay lagoon and salt pans. Walvis Bay lagoon and surrounding wetlands area became a RAMSAR wetland site of international importance in 1995. This is the most important feeding area on the west coast of Southern Africa for many migratory birds, making it a prime location to spot some more coastal bird species. Dinner will be taken out in town again this evening. Two nights Cornerstone Guesthouse. All meals.


Cornerstone Guesthouse

Occupying a quiet corner of Swakopmund’s old town near the marine museum and the old brewery, Cornerstone Guesthouse offers the charm and intimacy of a family-run B&B combined with the modern amenities of a luxury hotel. Each of the seven rooms have a private entrance and patio with table and chairs; inside, the rooms are light, spacious and neat with tile and wood floors and beach house colors. All rooms have en suite bathrooms with large solar-assisted showers and modern fittings including international wall sockets and wireless internet access.

August 23 & 24: Damaraland


Today we continue heading north and east into the wonderful and diverse region of Damaraland. We will pass Namibia’s highest mountain, the Brandberg, which peaks at 2,573 m above sea level, and take time to view animals and absorb the vastness of the scenery along the way. Damaraland is typified by displays of color, magnificent table topped mountains, rock formations and bizarre-looking vegetation. The present day landscape has been formed by the erosion of wind, water and geological forces which have formed rolling hills, dunes, gravel plains and ancient river terraces. It is the variety and loneliness of the area as well as the scenic splendor which will reward and astound you, giving us an authentic understanding of the word 'wilderness'. If time allows this afternoon we will visit the nearby attractions and geological sites of Twyfelfontein rock engravings (recently declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site), Burnt Mountain and the Organ Pipes - if not there is plenty of time to do so tomorrow.


Mowani Mountain Camp

Today we continue heading north and east into the wonderful and diverse region of Damaraland. We will pass Namibia’s highest mountain, the Brandberg, which peaks at 2,573 m above sea level, and take time to view animals and absorb the vastness of the scenery along the way. Damaraland is typified by displays of color, magnificent table topped mountains, rock formations and bizarre-looking vegetation. The present day landscape has been formed by the erosion of wind, water and geological forces which have formed rolling hills, dunes, gravel plains and ancient river terraces. It is the variety and loneliness of the area as well as the scenic splendor which will reward and astound you, giving us an authentic understanding of the word 'wilderness'. If time allows this afternoon we will visit the nearby attractions and geological sites of Twyfelfontein rock engravings (recently declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site), Burnt Mountain and the Organ Pipes - if not there is plenty of time to do so tomorrow.

After an early breakfast we set out on an exciting 4x4 excursion along the ephemeral Aba Huab River valley to explore this remarkable region and to search for game, including the elusive desert adapted elephants if they are in the area. Damaraland is home to a variety of desert adapted wildlife and hidden desert species. We return to camp for lunch and this afternoon we visit Twyfelfontein and other nearby attractions if we haven’t already done so, or take a walk with our guide in the wilderness around camp. Two nights Mowani Mountain Camp. All meals.

August 25 & 26: Western Etosha National Park


Today we head to Etosha National Park, traveling via the Grootberg Pass. Along the way we will visit a local Himba settlement; we may have to search for a while as the semi-nomadic Himba people tend move location with no notice! The Himba are one of the last traditional peoples of Namibia and one of the last truly nomadic tribes in Africa. Later this morning we enter the Etosha National Park through the Galton Gate on the western boundary and game drive our way on to the Dolomite Camp, arriving in the early afternoon. This previously restricted western section of Etosha was previously kept solely for research and rehabilitation of game and so it boasts some of the highest numbers of wildlife throughout the Park.

August 26th, we have full day of game drives in the Western parts of Etosha with a picnic lunch. Etosha National Park covers 22,270 km², of which approximately 5,000 km² is made up of saline depressions or ‘pans’. The largest of these pans, the Etosha Pan, can be classified as a saline desert in its own right.The Park boasts some 114 mammal and over 340 bird species. We’ll look out for elephant, lion, giraffe, blue wildebeest, eland, kudu, gemsbok (oryx), zebra, rhino, cheetah, leopard, hyena, honey badger and warthog, as well as the endemic black faced impala. We return to the camp this evening in time to freshen up before dinner. Two nights Dolomite Camp. All meals.


Dolomite Camp

Nestled in the dolomite outcrops of this vast area of western Etosha National Park, Dolomite Camp offers an intimate experience of one of the most scenic areas of the Park, an area where previously endangered species like the Black Rhinoceros and Black-Faced Impala have been successfully bred. The Camp consists of a spacious reception, lounge, bar and restaurant area – offering crimson sunrise and sunset views over the surrounding savannah. From this point, a walkway leads to thatched, en suite chalets nestled amongst the rocky outcrops, providing privacy and dramatic and panoramic landscape views. The Resort’s interiors are designed to harmonize with the natural surroundings, characterized by weathered dolomite rock formations, Mopane, Moringa and savannah woodland.

August 27: Ongave Private Reserve, Southern Etosha Boundary


This day will be spent on an extended game drive to southern Etosha National Park. You will visit selected waterholes along the way and then exit the park at Andersson Gate to stay at Andersson’s Camp, situated just outside the park in the Ongava Private Game Reserve. All meals.


Andersson's Camp

Set against a backdrop of the low Ondundozonanandana Mountains, Andersson's Camp is located within the private Ongava Game Reserve which borders onto Etosha National Park. The Ongava Game Reserve is typified by white calcrete soils, rocky outcrops and scrub-covered plains which support a rich variety of game such as giraffe, lion, rhino and various antelope species. The Camp overlooks a waterhole where guests can enjoy the interaction of wildlife coming and going throughout the day and night. The design and construction of Andersson’s Camp was guided primarily by the principles of environmental sustainability – reduce, reuse, recycle. The old farmhouse now forms the main dining, bar and swimming pool area of Andersson's Camp, with the tents radiating outwards into the secluded Mopane woodlands typical of the region. Each tent has been constructed using a clever mix of calcrete stone cladding, canvas and wood, with double-door entrances and a small verandah that is an extension of the elevated wooden decks on which the tents are raised. The open air en suite bathrooms continue the unique design.

August 28: Depart or Begin Extension


This morning you will depart back to Windhoek via Okonjima, where participants on the extension will stay for 3 nights at the AfriCat Foundation, Outjo and Otjiwarongo. There is the option to stop off at Okahandja’s Woodcarvers market along the way to do some curio shopping before continuing to Windhoek. Breakfast, lunch. Please note that your flight time must be no earlier than 5 pm to allow for enough time to check in at the airport.


Rates -
Dates Per Person Double Single Supplement
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