Wilderness Safaris channels conservation African Safari tourism as a force for lasting positive impact for the wildlife and communities, and as such,  wanted to share some images from the 2020 Photo Competition that had a lasting positive impact.

The Africa in Focus competition was a great success this year, making a significant contribution to Wildlife Safaris Conservation Heroes campaign by raising funds for communities in need and protecting pristine wilderness areas. Altogether the entries raised a staggering ZAR250 000, which will aid in delivering food and essential supplies to those worst hit by the pandemic throughout our Wilderness Safaris regions.

This selection of photos created a particularly positive impact – i.e., not only striking images, but photos that create an emotional link between you and the subject.

 

“What I like about photographs is that they capture a moment that’s gone forever, impossible to reproduce.”

– Karl Lagerfeld

 
“A Leopard’s Window” by Chris Renshaw; this for me was one of those experiences where a leopard and its youngster showed us the real art of camouflage

 

 

“Buffalo Herd Okavango Delta” by Peter & Beverly Pickford

 

 

“Just Chilling” by Kevin Lucke

 

 

“Rainbow Colours” by Bence Mate; bee-eaters gather before flying away to spend the night in their underground nests. I waited for the moment when the birds on the branch were motionless while the faded wings of the bird flying in the background refracted the light like a prism.

 

 

“The One and Only King” by Anja GrÃbel; the one and only king overlooking his kingdom in the morning…

 

 

“Visiting Himba” by Pawel Gluza

 

 

“We’re Out of Here” by Elize Labuschagne; the drought on the Etosha plains mad the animals skittish, and when one jumped, the rest followed

 

 

“Cautious Approach” by Janet Kleyn; hundreds of guineafowl gathered at a waterhole one morning. From a distance we could hear them start alarm calling. To our surprise this female leopard and her two cubs came walking through the guineafowls, which parted way for them.

 

 

“Dragonfly” by Graham Maskell

 

 

“Desert Lion Researcher” by Sarah Gold; Dr Philip “Flip” Stander, the world’s pre-eminent expert on vulnerable desert-adapted lions, lives in his specially outfitted vehicle for weeks at a time, following lion prides with radio telemetry. Sometimes, lacking paper, he writes their location co-ordinates on his own body.